Travel Bloggers Give Back

The cool website Green Global Travel has introduced a series called Travel Bloggers Give Back, asking travel bloggers to write about their favourite charitable organsation. In short, we’re being challenged to use our blogs to make a difference. Can’t say no to that now, can I?

give back

Médecins Sans Frontières

My preferred humanitarian organisation is MSF, Médecins Sans Frontières (known as Doctors without Borders in the USA).

I’m certainly not their only fan. MSF received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1999, in the words of the Nobel Committee: in recognition of the organisation’s pioneering humanitarian work on several continents.

Médecins Sans Frontières was created by doctors and journalists in France in 1971. The organisation aids people affected by armed conflicts, crises and disasters and others who lack basic health care.

Why MSF?

Among all the wonderful charitable organisations in the world, why do I choose this one? Well, firstly, it’s something very efficient and unafraid about MSF that appeals to me. MSF immediately get out in the field. They crash right in and get to work, helping the ones who need it the most.

Like many other aid organisations, MSF is independent from all political, economic or religious powers. They look only at need – no matter who, where or why.

What sets MSF apart, I think, is their commitment to speak out – often loudly – to bring attention to abuse and injustice around the world. It’s simple, really: fewer people die when more people know.

Notably, MSF was very vocal during the 1990s conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, Chechnya and Rwanda. MSF is also responsible for shining a light on the neglected crisis in Darfur. Lately, the organisation has spoken out against the forcible return of Hmong refugees from Thailand to Laos.

Donations

90 % of MSFs funding is from private donations, ensuring freedom from political interference and bureaucracy. Donations help save lives. They help pregnant women give birth safely, treat children with malaria and provide surgery for people wounded by bombs and bullets. 87 % of UK donations are spent on the programmes.

I’m the sole provider for my two daughters. As such, I’m well aware of the importance of a predictable income. That’s no less important to an aid organisation. I’m therefore a field partner, drawing a set amount from my bank account every month. In return, I receive ground-level reports from MSF-personnel in the field. Just yesterday, I learned about Monica Thallinger, a pediatrician who works in a Somali refugee camp in Ethiopia.

Here’s what your monthly contributions can provide (clipped from the USA site):

  • $7.50 monthly – Two nourishing meals every day for a month to a child threatened by famine
  • $15 monthly – A month of clean water for 40 refugees
  • $30 monthly – A surgical kit to carry out emergency examinations and basic surgery in the field
  • $60 monthly – A month of nursing care for refugees from war or natural disaster

Doctors without Borders 024

Want to give back via MSF?

MSF comprises 19 associative organisations and donations go through national offices in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and the United States. Choose your office.

ps – Heard of Magnificent Monday?

Not only is Green Global Travel focussing on charity this month. Holes in my Soles has GOODWILL as theme for this week’s Magnificent Monday as well. Go on over and have a look at the contributions. Or even better, write an article on goodwill (such as your fave humanitarian organisation) and link up.

Top photo is lifted from MSF’s website and photo of MSF-flag is by ricklibrarian on flickr’s Creative Commons.

There are so many non-profits doing important work around the world. Which is your favourite charity?

The cool website Green Global Travel has introduced a series called Travel Bloggers Give Back, asking travel bloggers to write about their favourite charitable organsation. In short, we’re being challenged to use our blogs to make a difference. Can’t say no to that now, can I?

Médecins Sans Frontières

My preferred humanitarian organisation is MSF, Médecins Sans Frontières (known as Doctors without Borders in the USA).

I’m certainly not their only fan. MSF received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1999, in the words of the Nobel Committee: in recognition of the organisation’s pioneering humanitarian work on several continents.

Médecins Sans Frontières was created by doctors and journalists in France in 1971. The organisation aids people affected by armed conflicts, crises and disasters and others who lack basic health care.

Why MSF?

Among all the wonderful charitable organisations in the world, why do I choose this one? Well, firstly, it’s something very efficient and unafraid about MSF that appeals to me. MSF immediately get out in the field. They crash right in and get to work, helping the ones who need it the most.

Like many other aid organisations, MSF is independent from all political, economic or religious powers. They look only at need – no matter who, where or why.

What sets MSF apart, I think, is their commitment to speak out – often loudly – to bring attention to abuse and injustice around the world. It’s simple, really: fewer people die when more people know.

Notably, MSF was very vocal during the 1990s conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, Chechnya and Rwanda. MSF is also responsible for shining a light on the neglected crisis in Darfur. Lately, the organisation has spoken out against the forcible return of Hmong refugees from Thailand to Laos.

Donations

90 % of MSFs funding is from private donations, ensuring freedom from political interference and bureaucracy. Donations help save lives. They help pregnant women give birth safely, treat children with malaria and provide surgery for people wounded by bombs and bullets. 87 % of UK donations are spent on the programmes.

I’m the sole provider for my two daughters. As such, I’m well aware of the importance of a predictable income. That’s no less important to an aid organisation. I’m therefore a field partner, drawing a set amount from my bank account every month. In return, I receive ground-level reports from MSF-personnel in the field. Just yesterday, I learned about Monica Thallinger, a pediatrician who works in a Somali refugee camp in Ethiopia.

Here’s what your monthly contributions can provide (clipped from the USA site):

  • $7.50 monthly – Two nourishing meals every day for a month to a child threatened by famine
  • $15 monthly – A month of clean water for 40 refugees
  • $30 monthly – A surgical kit to carry out emergency examinations and basic surgery in the field
  • $60 monthly – A month of nursing care for refugees from war or natural disaster

Doctors without Borders 024

Want to give back via MSF?

MSF comprises 19 associative organisations and donations go through national offices in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and the United States. Choose your office.

ps – Heard of Magnificent Monday?

Not only is Green Global Travel focussing on charity this month. Holes in my Soles has GOODWILL as theme for this week’s Magnificent Monday as well. Go on over and have a look at the contributions. Or even better, write an article on goodwill (such as your fave humanitarian organisation) and link up.

Top photo is lifted from MSF’s website and photo of MSF-flag is by ricklibrarian on flickr’s Creative Commons.

There are so many non-profits doing important work around the world. Which is your favourite charity?

17 Responses to “Travel Bloggers Give Back”

  1. David Bennett 5 December 2011 0228 #

    Giving money doesn’t come easy to me. I give a bit regularly to organisations I respect. Recently I gave a small amount to Smile Train, the charity that carries out operations on children with cleft palates (hare lips). I got a letter back and a photo – and it made me feel such a hero.
    David Bennett recently posted..Virgin, Northern Rock, And Crown Copyright Restrictions

  2. Anne-Sophie Redisch 5 December 2011 0320 #

    @David – I’ve not heard of Smile Train. What a lovely name for a cleft palates society.

  3. Vera Marie Badertscher 5 December 2011 0406 #

    I agree that Doctors Without Borders is a magnificent organization, and I give to them semi-regularly. I also love Heiffer International. As a blogger, however, I am a proud member of the Passports With Purpose effort that this is year building libraries in Zambia. What bloggers have accomplished in the past three years is nothing short of miraculous.
    Vera Marie Badertscher recently posted..7 Gifts That Give

    • Anne-Sophie Redisch 5 December 2011 0727 #

      @Vera Marie – Totally agree. Passports with Purpose is a wonderful community effort. I want to participate rather than just donate, but the idea of asking companies for prizes… well, it’s just too intimidating a task for me. But I suppose donations are just as important :)

  4. ItalianNotes 5 December 2011 0854 #

    Excellent choice of a good course to support.
    ItalianNotes recently posted..Fegato alla Veneziana

  5. Christian 5 December 2011 1333 #

    Médecins Sans Frontières is my favourite charity as well. I like their boldness.

  6. Stephanie - The Travel Chica 5 December 2011 1711 #

    This is such a great idea. I know there are a lot of great organizations out there, but it can be hard to find out about them.
    Stephanie – The Travel Chica recently posted..An Evening of Luxury in Buenos Aires

  7. Nomadic Samuel 5 December 2011 2113 #

    Sophie, this is such a great idea :)
    Nomadic Samuel recently posted..India Is | Video Competition

  8. Anne-Sophie Redisch 6 December 2011 0728 #

    @ItalianNotes, Christian, Stephanie, Samuel – It really is a great idea, isn’t it?

  9. Laurel 6 December 2011 1413 #

    I love the Travel Bloggers Give Back project and will be participating soon. It’s hard to believe that just $7.50 buys 2 meals a day a month for a child. Such a small amount for huge results.
    Laurel recently posted..My 3 Favorite Christmas Markets in Munich

  10. Tina 6 December 2011 1455 #

    I think it’s important to note that it doesn’t take very much to make a huge difference, as Lauren mentions above.

  11. Anne-Sophie Redisch 7 December 2011 1629 #

    @Laurel and Tina – So true! A little really goes a long way.

  12. Andrea 7 December 2011 1635 #

    I always liked this one too – have donated to them before – great cause!
    Andrea recently posted..Life in Petra

  13. heidimoorez 19 December 2011 2015 #

    Helping people in need no matter how big or small is very important as long as you did it whole heartily. Thank you for sharing this inspiring post…

  14. Anne-Sophie Redisch 20 December 2011 1245 #

    @Andrea and Heidi – Thanks for stopping by :)

  15. Alexa Meisler 24 February 2012 2051 #

    MSF is definitely a great choice and it’s success in helping out in the field is certainly not overlooked. Thank you for sharing!
    Alexa Meisler recently posted..Las Vegas Travel Tips For First Timers

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Travel Bloggers Give Back: Collective Drops in the Bucket Builds Wells – charity: water | Editorial Creatives - 9 December 2011

    […] Redisch – “Travel Bloggers Give Back” (Médecins Sans Frontières or Doctors without […]

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